Faculty Mentors

Felipe Gonzáles Castro, PhD, MSW

Professor
College of Nursing and Health Innovation

Arizona State University

Dr. Felipe González Castro is a Professor and Southwest Borderlands Scholar in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Washington. He is a Hispanic health psychologist, whose research program examines multivariate models of health behavior and behavior change, to study the role of cultural and non-cultural risk and protective factors in effecting health lifestyles, including drug, alcohol, and tobacco use, and in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. He utilizes a stress-coping- resilience paradigm to understand how cognitive, affective and behavioral factors affect health and well-being, including the expression of resilience. Dr. Castro is the originator of the Integrative Mixed Methods methodology, which offers a rigorous approach for conducting mixed methods research to examine the sociocultural determinants of health in Hispanic/Latino and other vulnerable populations. He has received research support from the NIDA, NCI, and the Rob- ert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Castro was inducted as a Fellow of Division 45 of the American Psychological Association. He was also awarded the Community, Culture and Prevention Science Award, and the Service to SPR award (in 2019), from the Society for Prevention Research.

Selected Publications:
Castro, F. G., & Barrera Jr, M. (2015). Cultural Adaptation of Empirically-Validated Therapies for Treating Drug Dependence. In Textbook of Addiction Treatment: International Perspectives (pp. 1007-1027). Springer Milan.

Castro, F. G., Barrera Jr, M., Mena, L. A., & Aguirre, K. M. (2014). Culture and alcohol use: historical and sociocultural themes from 75 years of alcohol research. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Supplement, (s17), 36-49.

Castro, F. G., Marsiglia, F. F., Kulis, S., & Kellison, J. G. (2010). Lifetime segmented assimilation trajectories and health outcomes in Latino and other community residents. American Journal of Public Health100(4), 669-676.